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Covid 19 Drink

Aber Falls Distillery Special Offer

Anyone who has tried the range knows that whether drank over ice, neat, or in a lovingly crafted cocktail, Aber Falls liqueurs are unique, flavoursome and unforgettable! There’s never been a better time to top up your stocks or create your new favourite drink with an exclusive offer now available when you take advantage of their home delivery service.

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Drink

Cwm Deri partners with St John Ambulance

In recognition of the huge work the volunteers for the St John Ambulance Charity do to support the NHS in their vital efforts to combat the Corona Virus, Cwm Deri have nominated them as their chosen charity partner for the next 6 weeks. Customers can enjoy some special Welsh treats whilst also giving to this worthwhile Charity.

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Drink

Celtic Brew… 800 years in the making

“Bragdy Lleu is an award-winning craft brewery based in Dyffryn Nantlle. We produce high quality beer with only the finest natural ingredients.

Established in 2013, we support the local economy and are passionate about the culture, history and language of Dyffryn Nantlle – the land of the Mabinogi. Every beer we brew is named after characters from the world-famous Welsh folklore legends, with elements of those characters conveyed in the unique character of each beer.

The business is evolving constantly, and by now we supply pubs across North Wales with casks and pubs, shops and restaurants all over Wales and beyond with bottles. In addition, we sell directly from the brewery and attend various events with our mobile bar, as well as supplying beer for events including weddings and celebrations of all kinds.

Celtic Brew… 800 years in the making.”

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Drink

pHure Liquors

A range of artisan gins, vodkas, rums made in small batches in a solar powered distillery. Kevin, Flower, who taught chemistry at the University of Manchester, has developed an eco-friendly distillery in the garage at his home in Conwy.  He threw caution to the wind, alongside university pals Andy Whiting and Euan Noble, to develop a unique brand of gin based on decades of combined scientific expertise. Their company, PHure Liquors, continues to go from strength to strength with a growing list of stockists including pubs, delicatessens and off licences across Wales. T: (01492) 437087 E: kevin@phure-liquors.com W: http://www.phure-liquors.com Open 8am-6pm  
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Confectionary Drink Jams, Chutneys and Preserves

Aerona are very much open

Aronia Berry products include 100% cold pressed juice, syrup, jelly, jam, chutney, liqueur, sweets and chocolates.

Services available: Call and collect | Online orders | Shop Open | Supply to Trade

Contact:

T: (+44) 017-66810387

E:info@aerona.wales

W: aerona.wales

Aerona, Rhedynog Isaf, Chwilog, Pwllheli , LL53 6LQ

Shop hours:    Monday – Saturday 9am – 4pm

To find the type of food or drink you’re after and keep our local community strong during and after COVID-19 visit the Welsh Produce Directory

 

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Drink

New cocktail launched in honour of Ladies of Llangollen who inspired TV’s Gentleman Jack

A new cocktail is being launched in honour of two aristocratic women who scandalised 18th century society when they eloped together from Ireland and settled in Llangollen.

The concoction called Ladies’ Dee-light that’s being unveiled at the town’s popular food festival will celebrate the lives of the Ladies of Llangollen, Lady Eleanor Butler and Sarah Ponsonby.

The new drink is the brainchild of two brothers whose micro bar business is taking North Wales by storm.

Trained mixologists Gruff and Ieuan Jones have enjoyed rapid success since launching their mobile cocktail bar, Booze Brothers, just 12 months ago. 

They have just toasted the launch of their own product range and will be raising a glass to Llangollen Food Festival  later this year with the cocktail that’s people will be able try for the first time at the festival that being held on Saturday and Sunday, October 19 and 20.

The event has now established itself as one of the highlights in the culinary calendar and has been named as one of the Top 10 food festivals in the UK.

It’s being held at the Llangollen Pavilion, less than a mile from the house, Plas Newydd, where Lady Eleanor Butler and Sarah Ponsonby lived.

They were regarded as eccentric characters and the exact nature of their close relationship remains a talking point to this day.

As well as working on their house and garden, the ladies spent their time in reading, studying foreign languages and corresponding with a wide variety of people.

Many of these were well-known figures of the day and they often came to visit the ladies.

Among them were the likes Wordsworth, the Duke of Wellington, Lord Byron, Sir Walter Scott and Anne Lister who was inspired to go home and informally marry her own lover as a result.

Lister’s life was recently immortalised in the hit television series starring Suranne Jones in the title role.

The series was based on Lister’s collected diaries which contain over four million words and are written largely in secret code, documenting a lifetime of lesbian relationships.
Former personal trainer Gruff, 26, from Wrexham, said: “When we started out, the Llangollen Food Festival was one of those events in the calendar we really wanted to attend and we just kept our fingers crossed that everything would go well and we’d get there.

“We’ve been there plenty of times as visitors but this is completely different. We’re really excited to show off our skills and bring along our bespoke cocktail bar.

“To help mark our first anniversary and our first visit to Llangollen Food Festival as a business we wanted to do something really special, and the Ladies’ Dee-light will celebrate the legendary Ladies of Llangollen and another local icon, the River Dee and the town centre Dee Bridge which is one of the Seven Wonders of Wales.

“Although nobody knows for certain whether their relationship was a sexual one, the Ladies of Llangollen are revered today as icons for the LGBT+ community.

“We will be keeping the recipe secret until the new cocktail is launched at the food festival but we  are keeping our fingers crossed it will be a hit.”

Gruff and former bartender Ieuan, 21, who run the Bargain Booze Plus Rhosddu store in Wrexham, had no intention of launching their own business a year ago.

Last summer, they were asked if they could share their gin knowledge and expertise at the Garden Village Fete in Wrexham. They bought a gazebo from Argos and set up a makeshift bar with a range of specialist gins – and it went down a treat.

“Obviously gin is very popular at the moment. We bought a little gazebo from Argos and put together a variety of gins and it was extremely busy!” said Gruff, a former Ysgol Morgan Llwyd pupil.

“From there, we started receiving emails from festival organisers and local people in the area asking us whether we could set up the same stand at their event or in their back garden.”

Such was the demand they established Booze Brothers, a name which communicates their shared love of good drink, and invested everything they made in the first year into a brand new triple horsebox which they professionally converted into a bespoke cocktail bar.

They also took themselves off to London and completed a course in Mixology at the London European Bartender School to learn more about the art of cocktail making.

“We absolutely never expected this success. We never even intended it to become a fully-fledged business,” explained Gruff, who grew up in Rhosllanerchrugog, near  Wrexham.

“It’s really a case of word-of-mouth momentum. We’ve really tried to nail down the quality of what we do and work hard perfecting the cocktails.

“A lot of bars provide a great offering when it comes to gin and also cask ales. When it comes to cocktail bars, often they’re stuck in the mould of what’s available already. What makes us different and professional is the fact we’ve moved towards customised cocktails.”

Although cocktails are the mainstay of their business, the bar carries a wide gin offering as well as plenty of other spirits including rums, whiskey and vodkas. However, the duo’s own Angel Delight Margarita and Raspberry Ripple Daiquiri cocktails have been so popular, they’ve now branched into product development with the launch of six tinned cocktails which will be available at events and local bars, restaurants, hotels and pubs in the near future.

“We’ve worked very hard to formulate these into bar standard cocktails,” said Gruff.

“We’ve not skipped on the alcohol content. When you’re buying from a supermarket, ready-made cocktails are all around 5% alcohol volume. Ours are around 14%.

“We’re now looking to push them out further in bars, hotels, restaurants and hotel chains locally and develop the branding.

“It’s all about the quality.”

Categories
Drink

Scientist on mission to create perfect gin with new solar-powered distillery

A scientist is on a mission to create the perfect gin after setting up his new solar-powered distillery in time for a top food festival this autumn

Former university lecturer Kevin Flower will be unveiling the special edition gin at the popular Llangollen Food Festival on Saturday and Sunday, October 19 and 20.

Kevin, 53, who taught chemistry at the University of Manchester, has developed an eco-friendly distillery in the garage at his home in Conwy.

Three years ago he threw caution to the wind, alongside university pals Andy Whiting and Euan Noble, to develop a unique brand of gin based on decades of combined scientific expertise.

Their company, PHure Liquors, continues to go from strength to strength with a growing list of stockists including pubs, delicatessens and off licences across North Wales.

It will be their second visit to the Llangollen Food Festival which has been named as one of the Top 10 food festivals in the UK.

This time they will be launching the new Autumn gin flavoured with seasonal fruits and berries.

“We came to Llangollen for the first time last year and it seems like the perfect place to celebrate our “50th batch” with a special edition gin using our new solar energy distillery,” explained Kevin who formerly worked as a university research fellow in Auckland, New Zealand.

“The recent addition of solar power has been really important, enabling us to generate more electricity than we need during the distillation process. In this way, we make a small contribution to reducing our carbon footprint.

“You only have to look at what’s going on in the news and the impact human activities are having on the environment to realise every little helps. Everything we make now uses green energy generated by ourselves.”

Solar power is not the only environmentally-friendly benefit from Kevin’s method of making gin.

“We also distil at a lower temperature and lower pressure than other commercial producers,” he said.

“By reducing the pressure, you reduce the temperature at which the liquid boils which is the reason why water boils at 71 degrees on the top of Everest.

“Our distillation temperature is around 35 degrees lower than in a normal copper still distillation so uses less energy. The pressure we distil at is equivalent to about 46,000 feet up.

“As custodians of the planet we have a duty of care. If you can reuse and recycle everything then we create as little rubbish as possible.”

Kevin, who is originally from Sussex and completed his degree and masters in chemistry at Bangor University, was teaching at a local college when he decided it was time for something different.

“Like many in the teaching profession, I’d had enough,” he said.

“It wasn’t the teaching it was everything that goes with it, so I was looking for other outlets.”

The scientists set themselves a friendly challenge to create a unique gin based on their knowledge of science.

“We took the classic academic approach, looking at various scientific literatures about distillation processes and we used that as a basis for how we were going to start, basically turning it into a scientific experiment,” explained Kevin, who has also lectured at the University of Sussex and the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST). 

Kevin borrowed an approach commonly used in medicinal drug discovery to find the perfect combination of flavours.

“It’s called “combinational” strategy,” explained Kevin, who divides his time between his business and private tutoring.

“In a sense, instead of deciding to put this much with that and doing it in a linear fashion you do it in a parallel fashion. We produced each of the botanicals individually. We then took out a fixed volume of each botanical and varied how much we added. We did the same with the second botanical and so on.

“We discovered that just by varying the amount you can achieve a very wide flavour range in a short space of time. It enables you to discover flavours very quickly or eliminate them far more easily, instead of throwing them all in at once and not liking what you find.

“The strategy, although new to gin making, has been around for donkeys’ years and is the way they search for active leads in chemistry.”

The result was the creation of its flagship pHure Gin, made from 96% organic wheat grain alcohol. It remains the company’s biggest selling gin thanks to its velvety smooth flavour and is the base for all its other gin products.

“One of my business partners runs a pub in Yorkshire and for nearly a year we trialled a small amount to see whether we could sell it,” said Kevin.

“Once we worked out people were buying it and coming back for more it was worth expanding and making more of it.”

The company produces occasional batches of Honey Gin and most recently launched strawberry and rhubarb flavours.

Euan, who lives in Yorkshire, is commercial director and looks after compliance/licensing issues while Andy, from Durham, is technical director and delivers presentations on gin production. 

“Sales are growing year on year. As we do more and go out more to food festivals we get more people interested in buying it,” explained Kevin, who is production director.

For now, Kevin is keeping tight-lipped about the special edition gin but says he’s looking forward to returning to the festival which has played a part in building the company’s reputation.

“Food festivals work very well for brand awareness,” he said.

“It’s basically good advertising and gives you the opportunity to go out and meet people who could become potential customers. Last year, we acquired a new delicatessen from just being at the festival. They’re really a great marketing and advertising exercise.”

Llangollen Food Festival committee member Phil Davies was delighted PHure Liquors had chosen the event to launch their special edition gin.

He said: “A major part of our role is enable our growing army of indigenous food and drink producers to have a higher profile by providing them with a shop window.

“I am looking forward to sampling the new, solar-powered gin at the festival and I wish them every success.

“Their eco-friendly approach is right on trend and I’m sure the taste will also hit the spot.”

For more information about Llangollen Food Festival go to www.llangollenfoodfestival.com

Categories
Drink Food Festivals

Hoppy homage to Welsh roots of Guinness is black and white issue

New dark ale being launched at Anglesey Food Festival

The reputed Welsh origins of the iconic Irish brew Guinness have inspired a new dark ale that’s being launched by the Anglesey Brewing Company.

Head brewer Tom Adamson will be unveiling the porter-style beer at the inaugural Anglesey Food Festival that’s being held on the Anglesey Showground from Thursday, May 30, to Saturday, June 1.

Tom, who’s based in Carmel, near Llannerch-y-Medd, has called it Gwin y Gwan which was the slogan used by Guinness in a series of Welsh language adverts in the 1950s which which was translated as Guinness for Strength in English.

According to Tom, a keen student of brewing history, Arthur Guinness developed his taste for the dark beer when he stopped off at a coaching inn in Llanfairfechan, near Bangor, on the last leg of his journeys back to Ireland following business trips to London.

The establishment where he stayed was called Gwyn Du which, allowing for some misspelling or corruption, translates into Black Wine.

Tom said: “When Arthur Guinness was staying over at the inn, the owner of it had been brewing this dark beer and apparently after a few years of travelling back and forth he actually asked for the recipe from the owner.

“The owner gladly gave it to him which led to the creation of the Guinness we know and love –  and the rest is now brewing history as they say.

”With Gwin y Gwan, I’m paying homage to a brewing legend and its Welsh roots.

“It’s  made from hops, barley and its secret ingredient – a special yeast – and the taste is earthy and chocolatey and at 4.8% it’s not too strong.

”I chose to call it Gwin y Gwan because that’s the affectionate name Welsh speaking people have for Guinness ever since those famous adverts because of its fortifying qualities.

“It even inspired a popular Welsh rock band, Eliffant, to use Gwin y Gwan as the title of their album that was released in 1980.”

The news that Guinness was invented by the Welsh is enough to drive the Irish to drink, especially on St Patrick’s Day on Sunday, March 17.

Appropriately, they’ll be raising a toast to their patron saint who was also said to be Welsh.

Patrick, or Padrig in Welsh, was born around 387 AD and was known as Maewyn (Welsh for devoted friend) Succat (a Pagan term for warlike).

He is believed to have come from Bannavem Taburniae, which could be Banwen in Neath Port Talbot, where every year a service is held in his honour.

Food festival organiser Davina Carey-Evans, managing director of Beaumaris-based Sbarc Event Management, said: “I wanted to give local and other Welsh producers an opportunity to show off the incredible foods, drinks and produce to a wider audience as possible.

“I believe there’s a real appetite for an Anglesey Food Festival and the public are going to have the opportunity to get a real taste of the very best of North Wales and Anglesey.

“It is the perfect location for a food festival because Anglesey is also known as Mn, Mam Cymru, or Anglesey, the Mother of Wales, because its fertile land, provided sufficient food for the whole of Wales.

“Appropriately, the festival will be taking place at the Anglesey Showground, the home of the island’s agriculture.

“We will be bringing together local fishermen, farmers, producers, restaurants and hotels to display the amazing variety of food and other produce source from the area.

“There will also be a range of cookery demonstrations with art and craft, music and children’s activities.

“The level of interest has already been huge so we’re looking forward to a great event.”